Yusef Lateef - In Nigeria

 
1. MU,OMI (Drink Water) 6:28

2. DRAMA\VILLAGE 6:01

3. AKIMA (Birth) 6:43

4. BLUES IN THE ADAJI 5:45

5. LALIT ( Lovers' Separation) 4:1 7 6. CURVED SPACETIME 5:27 7. RUWA MAIZURUFI (Deep Water) 4:20

(All selections composed by Yusef Lateef and published by Alnur Music-BMI)

YUSEF LATEEF - tenor saxophone, C-flute, Ebo rubberflute, gourd flute, Tiv chin flute, pneumatic bamboo flute, algaita, and vocals

Percussionists:

P. ADEGBOYEGA BADEJO - Hausa and Yoruba kalangu, gourd rattle, kuke

SALISU I. MASHI - gangan noma, duman girke, Hausa kalangu, kidan bare bari, kahoe, kidan ruwa

AWUIALU ADAMU - idiophones, duman girke

SHITTU ISYAKU - Tiv drums YUSUFU AMINU - kahoe

Voices:

IBN YUSEF A. LATEEF - vocal sounds

ESTHER KAWAI, VERONICA UGYE, TANI UMARU and AMINA ABDULLAHI - vocals

On Lalit and Ruwa Malzuruti -

YUSEF LATEEF plays tenor saxophone and C-flute only, with percussion by: BADEJO (tallabe, Yoruba kalangu), MASHI (algaita, kidan ruwa), AMINU (shuti box).

PRODUCED BY YUSEF LATEEF Engineeiring:

Onginal recording - MALAM MONDAY Additional recording and remix - BOB SCHOTT; assistant - JOHN ALBERTS

Mastering - GEORGE HORN

Recorded at EMI Studios (Lagos, Nigeria) on July 19, 1983. Additional recording and remix at Regent Sound Studios (New York City)

Digital Mastering - JIM HEMINGWAY Shutesbury, MA June 19 1995

Graphic Design - RICK WARD Illustrations - YUSEF LATEEF

Descriptive comments on the music, by Yusef Leteef:

These seven selections are basically dance pieces incorporating a wide variety of characteristics. They can be thought of as forming a hybrid suite, whose many elements include traditional dance (a generic term for African dances of folk origin), fast 2/4 duple time, slow 4/ 4 common meter (a dignified style with very few up-beats), moderate 4/4 meter compound duple time, poetic slow triple meter, motifs, fugal and inverted subjects.

Mu Omi, the Yoruba term for "drink water," has an unusual syncopated pattern produced by an emphasis on the second and fourth beats. which 4/4 time are normally the weak beats. The rhythm represents a synthesis of Nigerian and Jamaican sources.

Drama Village is a dance piece with an extra-musical, descriptive basis. The concept here is to evoke the idea of an unusual and beautiful theater made of mud and straw–an actual building on the Samaru Campus of Ahmadu Bello University of Zaria.

Akima is the Nupe word for "birth." This dance piece seeks to metaphorically validate the hypothesis that structure and substance may be born as one.

Blues in the Adeji utilizes a basic American musical form tinged with the many impressions experienced through living in this part of Nigeria. (Adaji is the Hausa word for "bush.")

Lalit is the Sanskrit word meaning "lovers' separation." This raga is an arrangement of sounds possessing varna and furnishing gratification to the senses. (The term varna refers to the act of singing, and is of four kinds–sihayi: repetition of the same sound; Arohi: ascent; Avarohi: descent; Sanchari: a mixture of ascent and descent.) In the beginning the plaintive sound of the Nigerian Hausa algaita is heard accompanied by the sensitive rhythms of the tallabe only to fade, making way for the pervasive drone of the shuti box–all providing background for the sympathetic flute, singing of the lovers' separation.

Curved Spacetime. To quote Fritjof Capra: "If one of two twins went on a fast round-trip into outer space, he would be younger than his brother when he came back home, because all his clocks–his heartbeat, blood flow, brain waves, etc.– would slow down during the journey."

Ruwa Maizurufi, meaning "deepwater" in the Hausa language, is a dance piece combining romantic, adventurous and non-verbal narrative elements. The kidan ruwa (water drum) and the Yorba kalanga (talking drum) consistently underlie the flowing melodic improvisation of the tenor saxophone.